Netflix Review: Tall Girl

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By: Ryleigh Reagan

Having only been released on Sept. 13 of this year, the Netflix original “Tall Girl,” written by Sam Wolfson is a unique take on self-love and acceptance with love interests and highschool drama mixed in. 

“Tall Girl” starts out as the stereotypical highschool love story with the awkward outsider protagonist that is searching for love, but while it follows that same basis throughout the whole movie,  it is so much more than just another heart-felt highschool romance.

Jodie Kreyman is a 6’1” and a half, and is an outcast at school with only two friends: her outgoing, carefree bestie, Fareeda, and her best friend since childhood who openly is in love with her, Jack. Jodi won’t accept Jack’s daily confessions, or any man shorter than her because it will only make her look more like a freak. Jodi also has a beauty pageant queen older sister, Harper, and two loving but very misunderstanding parents whose plans to make her feel more normal only make her feel worse about herself. 

This all starts to change when a Swedish foreign exchange student, Stig, arrives at school. Stig is not only taller than Jodi, but he shares her love for musicals and the piano, and they start to bond over this. At the same time, the most popular girl in school, Kimmy, shows interest in Stig. From there on, there’s makeovers, kissing, knife throwing, fights, lies and most importantly, acceptance. 

Without spoiling the movie, everything works out for Jodi,  just not the way she planned, and she learns to accept her difference and love herself for who she is. Yes, the movie has a lot of cheesy scenes, but director Nzingha Stewart makes up for these with laughs and several small plot twists that keep you guessing who will end up with who. 

The real hero of this story though is Liz, Kimmy’s friend who has a crush on Jack. Not only does she take the initiative in asking Jack on a date, but she also asks him to homecoming, and when Jack tells her that he’s in love with Jodi, she’s bummed but understanding. The best thing though, is that she goes to homecoming by herself and has a great time. While Jodi’s story to self-love is great, Liz shows what loving yourself really looks like.  

Overall, the movie is very cheesy but likeable. Its message is that we all have things that we don’t like about ourselves that we can’t change, but what we can change is how we deal with these. In a time where everyone struggles with liking the way we look, “Tall Girl” shows us that we need to accept ourselves and our differences, because we are all different, but that’s what is so great about us.