On Wednesday, March 28th, Western students had the opportunity to audition at the Western’s Got Talent show hosted by the Western Activities Council in Spratt 101.

Western students of all grade levels and various talents came to perform their gifts in front of judges in hopes of performing April 4th for a big prize.

WAC council member and Western events representative Natalie Miller assisted with putting the event together. Miller explained the purpose of the show.

“WAC hosts these events to get students out of their dorms where they can relax with friends and disconnect from the stresses of school for a while,” said Miller.

After participants auditioned, the judges decided on ten acts that will perform in the upcoming talent show. Miller explained what she enjoyed most during this process.

“I think they went well, Missouri Western is full of talented individuals,” said Miller. “My favorite part of auditions is the fact that every year students never cease to amaze me. Their talents and acts are so unique.”

Western student and “Western’s Got Talent” participant Zoie Reynolds, passed auditions as a spoken word artist. While Reynolds revealed her friends are what pushed her to try out at auditions, she also expressed what she believes will give her a chance at winning.

“I think I have a strong stage presence and a powerful message. Events like this are important to get students involved and also get them to interact with one another,” said Reynolds. “Also, it provides an outlet for artists and talents at mowest.”

When asked how she will prepare for the big act which will be open to the public, Reynolds revealed her pre-game plan.

“Practice. Practice. Practice,” said Reynolds. “I recite my poem whenever I have three free minutes, so I can know exactly what to do when I’m on stage and to also be comfortable when I’m up there.”

Jason Holliman, a Western student and successful participant of the talent show auditions, expressed why he decided to show his gift of dancing to the judges for the event.

“What made me want to audition was the experience because I’ve always been a performer. I never got to do anything I wanted personally in front of a crowd or a smaller one for that matter,” said Holliman. “I felt like auditions were just a snippet of what I have to show.”

Holliman explained why it’s important to have the opportunity to share your talents.

“I feel that I am very passionate about what I do as far as my talent goes which for this show is dancing and I can distribute that raw passion to myself and the audience,” said Holliman. “I think it’s important for mowest to have events like this because it lets students and faculty know that if students put their minds to it, we can be talented at anything we set our standards or heights too. I personally also feel like it can help us have a better understanding of one another passions.”

Holliman explained what his next steps are in pursuing the big prize.

“I will prepare myself for the show by learning the music from the order I selected it in and composing short and swift freestyle choreography for the audience,” said Holliman. “I also plan on researching the history of dancing a little more for my short monologue at the beginning of the performance.”

On Wednesday, April 4th, all ten acts will perform their gifts in front of three judges and a full audience. Miller revealed what she feels is most exciting about the event.

“I am excited to see MWSU students get out to support and cheer on their friends that are participating in the show,” said Miller.

Western students are encouraged to attend the “Western’s Got Talent” show to experience the gifts that fellow students around them are excited to share.

For more information on the talent show event or upcoming WAC events, visit the Western Activities Council in Blum Union.