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The government can’t legislate love

Miranda Elder and fiance Tayla Messa met in 2009 and are looking forward to their future together.
Miranda Elder and fiance Tayla Messa met in 2009 and are looking forward to their future together.

 

As times are clearly changing and the Supreme Court’s ruling of gay marriage nears, we hear the story of the relationship of Miranda Elder and Tayla Messa.

Elder and Messa, who first met in 2009 and were engaged on August 10 of last year, are one of Western’s several gay couples eagerly awaiting the nation’s verdict of the DOMA Act put into effect by former president Bill Clinton.

“We’re both in support of it obviously,” Elder said, “but it’s just a wait and see what happens kind of thing.”

The couple says that there is nothing they as individuals can really do to help further the cause of recognizing gay marriage but wait and hope that soon more states will see why gay marriage should no longer be illegal.

When asked whether she thought it was just a matter of time before the entire country recognizes gay marriage, Messa said, “I think so. You can clearly see from how people weren’t as in support of it before and now it’s starting to increase a lot.”

In support of her argument that the ban on gay marriage is coming to an end, Messa went on to explain that “as the younger generations keep getting elected into office, people will start realizing it needs to change.”

Recent polls show that the support for gay marriage is up, even since as early as this past December. It seems that the more the government and media address the topic, the more people are swayed to the side of lifting the ban on gay marriage.

For Messa and Elder, it was not easy dealing with the opinions of their family when they first told them they were engaged, more of a testament to the fact that though the tides are turning, this country still has a long way to go.

“It was pretty tough at first with my parents,” Messa said. “My dad is a huge conservative but the first time we talked about it, he said ‘I don’t care. I’ll love you no matter what.”

Though it took her mother longer to come around to the idea of her daughter marrying another woman, she too eventually moved towards the side of accepting gay marriage, as now more than half of the country has.

Messa is a student here at Western studying biology while Elder stays home and awaits Messa’s graduation, when she too will return to school.

The couple says they want to be graduated before they’re married, so they have not decided on what year they will get married, but they do have a date in mind.

“We do know the day but that’s kind of a nerdy thing,” Messa said. “It’s April 22 because of Dr. Who. We’re huge Dr. Who fans and Dr. Who gets married on the same day and that’s when time stops.”

Although most of the states in our country do not recognize gay marriage yet, that doesn’t stop partners like Messa and Elder from making plans for themselves and being together. Once married they plan to adopt children and move from Missouri to, by then, a recognizing state. Although the government may be standing in the way right now, this happy couple knows that love knows no bounds and no court ruling or politician can keep them apart.

Elder and Messa got engaged in August of 2012 and they will wed once they both graduate.
Elder and Messa got engaged in August of 2012 and they will wed once they both graduate.

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