Controversial student worker flyers posted

By Katelyn Canon

September 19, 2012

Unapproved posters desiring student workers to unite were hung anonymously around campus last Thursday, September 13.

Outlining student worker grievances, the posters have yet to be claimed.

One of two posters that have been seen around campus regarding the workers free-zone.


“Let me clarify, we are not sure how that approval came about,” Dean of Students and Interim Vice President for Student Affairs Judy Grimes said. “We only approve posters and flyers that are from our clubs and organizations, or our academic or university departments. We’ve checked with all of our students. We don’t know how it got stamped so it should not have been out there to start with.”

The posters were removed from campus buildings by the Center for Student Engagement the next day. Student Government President Jacob Scott clarified who has access to the approval stamps.

“Well as far as I am aware, I believe the stamps are actually provided by the Center for Student Engagement, and I believe the student workers of that office are in charge of reviewing the posters and then a poster that meets the guidelines for approval receives a stamp by the student worker,” Scott said.

The posters may have sounded as though there is a large group of student workers behind them, but that has not been confirmed. However, faculty and staff believe it was a student acting alone.

“My sense is there was an isolated incident, maybe even one student who is not happy about a situation that might have provoked something like that,” Grimes said.

Donnell Turner, the director for Career Development Center, agreed.

“It really appears, at least from the posters that I saw, that it’s representative of a number of students or a good deal of the student body, but that’s not what we’re hearing and that’s not what we are seeing or experiencing.”

Student Employment Coordinator Matthew Gregg would like to encourage the students that hung the posters to partake in an open dialogue.

“To me, just putting up posters doesn’t solve anyone’s problem,” Gregg said. “Putting up posters and then having open communications with whoever is fine. … You are entitled to your opinion. I just think it is best to go through the proper channels to make sure your voice is heard.”

Gregg also feels that students should utilize SGA if they feel uncomfortable coming to faculty or staff.

“If they don’t feel comfortable coming to us (Student Employment), let SGA come to us, and then let’s meet together and take it from there,” Gregg said.

SGA addresses all student concerns that are submitted through their proper grievance policy.

“Certainly we would be happy to listen to their concerns and do what we can to advocate on their behalf, but if you can’t sign your name to it it’s going to be difficult to address,” Scott said.

The Career Development Center also has an open door policy for student workers.

“I want students to feel that they have an open door here and that they have someone that is here to listen,” Gregg said. “That doesn’t mean I’m always going to agree or disagree with that group, but we’re going to be objective about the situation.”

Former SGA student Sen. Amber Nold denied to comment on the situation, yet admitted to hanging the posters around campus.

If any students involved in creating and hanging the posters are interested in sharing any information, please contact the Griffon News at 816-271-4412 or via email at thegriffonnews@gmail.com.

Comments

  1. Amber Marie says:

    First of all, I am still a senator. Second, you left out the Marie part of Amber Marie. Third, it would be “declined to comment,” not “denied to comment.”

    This is why I won’t give interviews to the Griffon news. Seriously, get with the program.

  2. Jackie Smith says:

    This worker sounds like an idiot to me! I cant believe it! I read both the editorial and this article. Can someone please tell me where she got the approval of this stamp! So disappointing of a former senator!

  3. James Garrison says:

    These are things you could have clarified if you actually gave an interview; they are not reasons not to. It is a little hypocritical to me to want to hang fliers all over campus to get my voice out there and not be willing to put my opinion in the schools paper. “seriously, get with the program.”