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Great Divide: Size does matter, bigger is better

Call it big government if you want to, I just can’t condemn it. Let me first apologize for my “socialist” tendencies—I just really like public schools, roads, and the work of our police and firemen. I appreciate our defense system and the fact that I’ve never seen a war on our land. I don’t mind paying taxes because in return I get to live in one of the greatest countries in the world. All in all, you could say I’m a happy, bleeding-heart, tax-paying liberal.

But the fear of government growing too big is a justifiable fear. The United States of America was founded on a need to serve the people rather forcing the people to serve the government. Our founding fathers wanted to create a union unfettered by the heavy hand of a king’s will. To prevent that from ever happening again, the US developed a system to empower the people. The people would cast votes to elect officials that represented their interests and that of the country. The majority would rule in the interest of fairness and compromise.

I hate the direction that politics has taken, but I realize that controversy is nothing new. When the stakes are high, people will do anything to ensure their own security and prosperity.

Perhaps people have lost sight of uplifting the most downtrodden of their population. I believe in keeping my moral values in line with my politics, and I believe we are only as strong as the weakest segment of our population.

The healthcare debate has been front and center since the election which landed President Obama in the White House. The lies and misconceptions which have been perpetuated by the right are evidence that republicans don’t want to be a part of progress. All progress can be construed as big brother’s inevitable takeover to steal your money, take your healthcare, and kill your grandma.

In the presently troubled economic times the public’s trepidation towards change is understandable. We are in the midst of the largest financial crisis since the depression. It doesn’t seem like a good time to fix the system because of the instability we face as a country. But rather than being paralyzed by fear, perhaps the need for progress is even stronger.

During the Great Depression President Franklin D. Roosevelt enacted the New Deal which put in place many social welfare departments to assist in the financial rehabilitation of our country. Among the departments was the social security office which was designed to aid the growing population of poverty stricken seniors. Though the change was not easy, it was necessary. The Obama administration’s current legislation raises concerns for citizens that too much money is added to the national deficit our children will repay. I like to believe we are developing a foundation that our children can stand on.

The USA is a great country. So why can’t we perfect the system our government runs? Don’t let a fear of “change” hinder the necessary. We should jump in first. There was a time when we considered ourselves innovators of freedom and democracy.

The GOP has crippled the public with a fear of the very nature of government. This rampant cynicism has taken a toll on the people. Progress isn’t the path of least resistance, but it is the only way to sustainable success.

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