SGA receives a facelift

By Lindsay Moyers

January 14, 2008

 The spring semester begins a fresh start, new faces and many changes to the Student Government Association.  The new executive board of SGA has created a list of goals to accomplish this semester.  “My main goal is to get a well-rounded and diverse senate that are very opinionated and don’t share the same ideas,” SGA Vice President Jennifer Kohler said. “I would also like to see SGA build a better relationship with faculty and administration.”  The organization recently combined positions on the executive board to make it smaller and to give the remaining positions more work to make their duties more valuable.  “For this term we appointed three executive board members,”  SGA President Harold Callaway said. “This goes a little bit against the constitution but it makes their jobs worthwhile.”  The motive of combining positions was to make the executive board more effective and helped save more money.  “I think combining positions was a great idea,” Director of Student Relations Stephanie Gromowski said. “Not only does this give me more work to do but this also saves SGA money.”   The senate would like to see more involvement among campus. One technique to get more students involved is the Student Involvement Program (SIP). The program is waiting to be approved by the senate.  “We are wanting to start the SIP to get students more involved,” Kohler said. “For example, if a student goes to a football game they will have their student id scanned. Their name will then go into a drawing pool for the spring concert where names will be drawn and prizes will be handed out.”  One project that is in the making is the idea of a flag way. This would be a row of flags lined up at the main entrance of the university to show the different countries where some of our students are originally from.  SGA is also trying to find more ways to let the student body know what the organization is all about and to retain more senators. The senate body currently sustains about 23 senators and can hold a total of 40 senators. They are looking to increase the number of senators, Callaway said.  “I possibly would like to be able to write a short column to the Griffon News each week letting the student body know what senate is working on,” he said. “This would be similar to a note from the president’s desk.”